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Regular Exercise Is Great for Mental Health – But Watch Out for Too Much

According to a study of 1.2 million adults across the U.S., people who engage in regular exercise report an overall healthier mental state than non-active or sedentary people. However, more exercise is not necessarily better for mental health. According to this research, daily exercisers actually report less mental wellbeing. This means, just like anything else, moderation is key to reap the health benefits of physical activity. And, according to the study, all kinds of exercise counts, including housework, mowing the lawn, caring for children, fishing, gym sessions, running, walking, and more. Researchers have continually proven that exercise can have major positive health effects, including lowered risks for stroke, heart disease, and diabetes. However, the link between good mental health and exercise is less certain. While the researchers in this particular study were able to positively link exercise to healthy mindsets, they weren’t able to demonstrate cause and effect. The study asked adults across the U.S. to give a ballpark estimate of how often during the previous month they would say their mental health was "not good" due to emotional issues, including those related to stress and depression. In addition, these adults reported their exercise habits during the previous month, including how long each session lasted. One major takeaway from the study: People who exercised regularly reported experiencing less mental health issues. In total, the exercisers reported 43% fewer days with mental health issues than non-exercisers.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Lancet Psychiatry. Volume 5, Issue 9, P692-693, September 01, 2018.